Majorelle

There’s a Lot Going On at Majorelle

Like Red Snapper Tagine, a Fireplace-Lit Lounge and a Garden for Warmer Days

By Ilana Dadras ·
C59f93113761cc017e495cf80945a3a313 PhotosMajorelle
Oh, God.

This isn’t going to be good. This isn’t going to be good at all.

Best just throw on a onesie and plan to hole up in your living room till Stella passes and someone else takes care of the aftermath.

And when the snow clears, best seek refuge in Majorelle: a mecca of Moroccan-Mediterranean goodness tucked into the Lowell hotel. It’s opening Wednesday on the UES.

Now that we’ve got your plans settled, let’s run through the pertinents:

Little history—the man behind this spot is a member of the family behind La Grenouille. Some family stuff ensued and, yada, yada, yada, here’s this place.
Just a few blocks away. It’s looking damn good.

You’ll enter through a bar with leather walls, an antique-mirrored ceiling and a long slab of marble.
This part is called Jacques. It’s not open just yet, but when it is, you can use it to post up with some oysters, steak tartare with caviar or fluke ceviche with rose and pomegranate. So when you can, you should.

Pass through to the dining room, where tagines and soufflés roam free.
It’s pretty damn elegant in here, with smoked mirrors, velvet banquettes and the like. Solid date spot, indeed. Have a look.

It thus follows that the food will impress.
They’ve got foie gras with sautéed apples and calvados, bass with champagne and caviar, red snapper tagine with Moroccan olives and preserved lemon... menu’s right here. They’ve got an oven dedicated entirely to soufflés, so rounding out your meal with a Cointreau soufflé is pretty much mandatory.

Once that’s done, after-dinner drinks happen in the Clubroom.
Which is a cozy lounge with armchairs, art books to read in said armchairs and a working fireplace to warm you on said armchairs. It’s just through the dining room.

And you don’t need to know about this now, but...
There’s also an attractive garden patio for better days.

Second thought, maybe now’s when you need to know about it the most.

Ilana Dadras cannot discern between situations in which sarcasm is and is not appropriate. Her favorite things include mezcal cocktails, Big Sur and writing about herself in the third person.

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