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The Season Demands Axes. Here Are Axes.

Firewood doesn’t chop itself. Christmas trees don’t fell themselves. Lumberjacks don’t... look generally like you.

But that last could change.

Because you’re receiving a guide to the greatest axe-owning opportunities this holiday season has to offer, ranked by wood-chopping intensity. From hand-painted wood splitters to genuine Viking battle-axes, here’s everything you need to show that log who’s boss.

You’re the boss in that scenario.

Max Multi-Purpose Axe
INTENSITY LEVEL: 1

Max Multi-Purpose Axe

You require: An axe. But also... a lot of other stuff. That you don’t feel like buying separately.
You’ll receive: An axe that can also be a shovel, pick, mattock, broad pick, hoe or fire rake depending on what tool you attach to the axe head. That part never comes off.

The Keegan Axe
INTENSITY LEVEL: 2

The Keegan Axe

You require: A solid woodchopper—with a good backstory.
You’ll receive: A Hudson Bay–style axe head with a solid hickory handle, made in North Carolina and hand-painted by an artist in Philadelphia. You thought we were going to say Portland, didn’t you?

U.S.T. SaberCut Camp Axe
INTENSITY LEVEL: 3

U.S.T. SaberCut Camp Axe

You require: Something that will let you throw around the word “tactical” a lot.
You’ll receive: This compact and lightweight stainless steel number with a 5 mm thick blade. Perfect for clearing the underbrush around your camp/cleaving watermelons at home.

The Japanese Axes
INTENSITY LEVEL: 4

The Japanese Axes

You require: Anything, so long as it’s been made by a father and his three sons in a workshop utilizing traditional Japanese blacksmithing methods.
You’ll receive: Any of the specimens from Best Made’s Japanese axe collection, which fit that above description quite splendidly.

Baltic Viking’s Axe “Braveheart”
INTENSITY LEVEL: 5

Baltic Viking’s Axe “Braveheart”

You require: Something for battle. Or something that will look great hanging above your mantel while you watch Game of Thrones.
You’ll receive: This historic replica of a seventh-century Viking axe. You’ll have to wait six to 12 months for it to be made, but it’s a better option than time travel.

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