Culture

You Don't Need a Summer Body

It's Time Get Rid of the Term Once and for All

By Diggy Moreland ·
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Juice Images/Getty Images

The good news: it would appear that winter, and whatever chilly vestige of it lay with spring, is finally behind us.

The maybe not-so-good news: that “summer body” people have been telling you how to achieve for the past few months may not be summer-y enough yet.

But that’s okay. Because while summer—or “skin season,” to the bold—certainly requires less clothing at BBQs, patio brunches, pool parties, beach parties, boat parties, party parties and the like, it doesn’t necessarily mean you should work yourself up about getting in shape—at least not more than usual.

In fact, we think the entire notion of a “summer body” is somewhat ridiculous. Sure, we’re proponents of a healthy diet and exercise (and washboard abs, if you have them). But the idea of pressuring oneself to look a certain way for a certain season and that certain season alone is preposterous.

Which is why we’re saying what no one else will: you don’t need a summer body. And here are four reasons why...           

Last We Checked, Fall, Winter and Spring Still Exist
Referring to your temporary physical self as a “summer body” is a horrible mindset. What, pray tell, about the other nine months of the year? If you do indeed plan on working out harder or exclusively for the months of June, July, and August, and finally achieve this ever-so-desirable body, why not keep it past September 22nd? Unless there is some “summer body” expiration date we’re not aware of, the same body that you worked so hard to achieve for the summer can look equally as hot for the remaining three months—even if it’s under some overpriced parka. Not only is it smarter (and saner) to maintain a consistent level of fitness year-round, it’s healthier.

A “Summer Body” Is for Other People; an All-Year-Round Body Is for You
Implicit in the “summer body” is the idea that you’re working towards one in order to show it off to other people (perhaps not exclusively, but mostly, to other people you’re attracted to). And while, yes, we totally get wanting to get a six-pack for other people, the primary reason you should be getting into shape is for...well, you.

Do You Really Want to Be That Guy?
You know, that guy. The guy who oils up before the pool party, takes an hour to get his hair just right and spends the entire day in a constant state of Instagram-readiness. That guy probably worked hard on his “summer body,” and now he wants to show it off. Which is great; he should. But you don’t want to be the guy for whom every social gathering is just another opportunity to show off your body—particularly in situations where you’d look better in a stylish short-sleeve button down. You want to be the guy for whom having a good body is no big deal. You don’t want it to define you. If that’s the way you see yourself, that’s the way others will, too. 

Internal > External
Is “it’s what’s on the inside” too cliché? Doesn’t matter. We’re using it, anyway. Let’s face it, our eyes are going to take us to what’s attractive, and we can’t help it. But let’s remember, that’s only the beginning. Yes, I might be able to take a tequila shot out of your perfectly framed belly button, but let’s be real—at some point, we’re going to have to engage in some sort of conversation, and that’s where the real connection happens.

So let’s get rid of the term “summer body” once and for all. That same energy/motivation/gym-crush can inspire us to keep that body for all the seasons, whether it’s visible or not. And for those that do want to get skin season-ready immediately, here's a quick tip: high reps, low weight and heavy cardio.

Have fun out there.

Diggy Moreland made a name for himself on season 13 of The Bachelorette with his keen fashion sense and proclivity for bowties. He also owns 652 pairs of sneakers. And counting.

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