Sen Sakana

Sen Sakana Was Worth the Wait

Peruvian Meets Japanese Meets Your Face

By Ilana Dadras ·
487718155d5f62299b59bb54bdc8644b20 PhotosSen Sakana
In the late-1800s, some 7,000 Japanese workers were invited to Peru on two-year contracts with the promise of jobs in sugarcane farming and the like. Naturally, some stayed. Started businesses. Families. Did other things that happen when people stay places.

Which is all to say, to our benefit, the supercuisine that is Nikkei now exists. And here's what might be the most exciting example of it since Nobu...

It's called Sen Sakana, it's now open in the Theater District, and so not surprisingly, pre-theater dinners and post-theater drinks are a go here.

Once inside, you'll find yourself in a beautiful, cavernous, bi-level space that's all blonde wood and endless two-tops, with an elevated sushi bar in the back. And you've got two chefs in the kitchen, each handling their respective cuisine: a Peruvian chef most recently hailing from a nice Queens steakhouse, and a Japanese chef who's spent time at Ootoya. Some menu highlights include hot shrimp ceviche with Japanese mushrooms, the entire section dedicated to skewers of pork belly-wrapped Peruvian cheese and/or crispy chicken skin and/or other tasty things of interest and ceviche sliders on sweet potato buns which sound strange but are actually very delicious. Have a look at the whole thing right here.

On the imbibing side, you've got a slew of cocktails to consider, like the One Thousand Fish (with house-dried bonito flake-infused South American pisco) and the Sen Sakana Sour (with cucumber, ginger, and celery bitters).

All that's left now is to have a look at the place, which you can do here.

Ilana Dadras passes her days writing about good food, talking about good food and consuming good food. Occasionally doing other things, too.

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